Blake Pearson, MD

Poster Presenter

Blake Pearson, M.D. is a member of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario and a board-certified family physician in the U.S. He is a practicing family physician who has focused his practice on cannabinoid medicine and is recognized throughout Canada as a key opinion leader in the field, accepting referrals from across Ontario and educating fellow medical professionals around the world.

 

Dr. Pearson is the Founder and Chief Medical Advisor at Greenly Medical Consulting (GreenlyMed.com), which aims to educate patients, the public and fellow medical professionals on cannabinoid medicine, improve patient access and further understanding of its role in the integrative treatment of complex conditions. Dr. Pearson is also the founder and Chief Medical Advisor at Greenly Health, which specializes in providing cannabinoid therapy in long-term care and retirement settings.

 

Prior to joining the Rapids Family Health Team in Sarnia, Ontario, Canada, Dr. Pearson completed his residency in family medicine at Wayne State University – Crittenton Hospital in Rochester, Michigan, where he was Chief Resident.

Cannabis use as an alternative for opioids, antipsychotics and antidepressants among geriatric patients in a long-term care setting: A case series

Seniors in Canada’s long-term care (LTC) facilities are twice as likely to be prescribed opioids and three times as likely to be on antidepressants than others their age. On average, LTC patients in Canada are on 9.9 different classes of medications (compared to 6.7 in the community) and research has clearly established a strong correlation between polypharmacy and increased risk of negative health outcomes, falls, adverse drug events, and higher health costs. This case series describes therapeutic cannabis use as an alternative for opioids, antipsychotics and antidepressants among geriatric patients in a long-term care setting. All patients started on the cannabinoid protocol experience a large reduction in their opioid, antidepressant and antipsychotic doses with no increase in gait disturbances or falls.